Using Local Functions

A local function can be declared in the body of a script to avoid repetitions. However, as the body of a script at runtime is interpreted as the body of a function (see Supported Scripting Languages), not all languages allow declaring functions within functions.

JScript

JScript allows you to declare local functions without any restrictions. For example:

// Separation script (JScript)
function shouldProcess(block){
   if(block.Text.indexOf("ABBYY")>=0){
       return true;
   return false;
}
function process(block){
   // Do something with a block
}
for(var i = 0; i < this.TextBlocks.Count; i++){
   var block = this.TextBlocks(i);
   if(shouldProcess(block)){
       process(block);
   }
}

.NET

In .NET languages, you can use Lambda functions. For example:

// Separation script (C#)
System.Func<ITextBlock, bool> shouldProcess = (block)=>{
   if(block.Text.IndexOf("ABBYY")>=0){
       return true;
   }
   return false;
};
System.Action<ITextBlock> process = (block)=>{
   // Do something with a block
};
foreach (ITextBlock block in page.TextBlocks){
   if(shouldProcess(block)){
       process(block);
   }
}

VBScript

VBScript does not allow you to declare local functions, but you can use the ExecuteGlobal method to declare a global function or class.

20.09.2022 9:27:51

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